Taiwan preparing for violent Typhoon

4 08 2015

A Typhoon is expected to bring flooding to parts of Taiwan and eastern China later this week with 500-700mm of rain forecast. Typhoon Soudelor is at the moment moving through the northwestern Pacific Ocean and looks likely to track across central Taiwan on Friday before making landfall over eastern China as it weakens.

This is a violent typhoon and is presently 500 miles to the west of the Northern Mariana Islands in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and is moving towards Taiwan. Currently surface wind speeds are estimated to be 130 mph with gusts of 190 mph, although these speeds are likely to ease slightly before reaching Taiwan.

Picture courtesy of Japanese Meteorological Agency

Picture courtesy of Japanese Meteorological Agency

This storm brings the threat of a storm surge and high waves to coastal areas of Taiwan and the southern Ryukyu Islands by Friday, as well as very strong winds quite widely, including to the capital of Taiwan, Taipei. Torrential rain is also expected which will bring a risk of significant flooding with the potential for 500-700mm rain falling in some areas in a 24 hour period.

The exact track of the storm could change over the coming days; you can see the latest track of Typhoon Soudelor through Storm Tracker and by following @metofficestorms on Twitter.





One metre of rain to fall in the Bay of Bengal

29 07 2015

Parts of the Ganges Delta have already seen over 240mm of rain in just 24 hours and coastal areas to the north of the Bay of Bengal are expected to receive over 1000mm over the coming 48 to 72 hours. The area will also see some strong winds, with gust of up to 60mph along the coast. This severe weather is likely to have significant impacts with a risk of flooding, landslides and damage to infrastructure.

Satellite image of monsoons over Pakistan, Bay of Bengal, and South China

Satellite image of monsoons over Pakistan, Bay of Bengal, and South China

After a break in monsoon rainfall across parts of India through much of July, the region is now experiencing a more active phase. Over the Bay of Bengal, a deep monsoon depression has developed, bringing a period of prolonged heavy rain and strong winds to coastal districts of northeast India, Bangladesh and northwest Myanmar. A monsoon depression is an area of low pressure which brings intense rainfall, and with other ingredients in place, can develop into a tropical cyclone.

The monsoon depression is expected to remain slow moving, tracking into Bangladesh over the next few days before gradually moving west across northeast India over the weekend.

Unusually, this is one of three monsoon depressions affecting South Asia. As well as the monsoon over the Bay of Bengal there is a monsoon bringing heavy rainfall to northwest India and Pakistan with as much as 430mm of rainfall falling in 24 hours. A third slow-moving depression is also affecting northeast Vietnam and southeastern China. 543mm 718mm has fallen in 42 66 hours in Mong Cai City on the border between Vietnam and China, an area that was affected by Tropical Storm Kujira last month.

Elsewhere in the world, the hot dry conditions which have affected southern Europe through much of July have led to some wildfires in Catalonia, Spain, and the Provence region of France. There is expected to be some respite from the high temperatures across Spain and France though in the coming days as a cold front pushes in from the north bringing a risk of heavy showers and thunderstorms to northeast Spain and Southern France by the weekend.

 





Typhoon Utor makes landfall in southeast China

14 08 2013

Typhoon Utor is currently a strong tropical cyclone and has recently made landfall near Yangjiang, southeast China which is approximately mid-way between Hong Kong and Zhangjiang. Utor is currently moving slowly north-northwest and is expected to continue along this track for the next three days and weaken as it remains overland.

Typhoon Utor

The impacts of Typhoon Utor have already been felt across the Philippines, with four people dead and homes and crops destroyed. The strong winds and high waves associated with Utor may have also have been a factor in the sinking of a large cargo ship off Hong Kong harbour.

Heavy rainfall is expected to lead to very heavy rainfall over southeast China where 150 – 200 mm are forecast in the next 24 hours, particularly near Zhangjiang and Yangjiang. This is likely to cause severe flooding, flash flooding and landslides.

Typhoon Utor

A significant storm surge occurred in the Phillipines and is expected to intensify flooding in southeast China. Forecasts suggest a peak storm surge of 2.4 m above normal tides between Hong Kong and Yangjiang. This will also be accompanied by very high waves which will cause over topping of harbours and coastal flood defences. Winds will continue to be very strong for at least the next 24 hours and will continue to affect power lines and transport infrastructure.

The main areas of heavy rainfall are expected to move north and east during Thursday and Friday with very large rainfall accumulations (150 – 200 mm per day) expected over northern Guandong province leading to further flash flooding and landslides.

Follow @metofficestorms on Twitter for the latest updates on tropical storms, hurricanes and typhoons.








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